If you are using a screen reader and are having problems using this website, please call (323) 513-6222 for assistance.
Venues
Ticketed by AXS.com - Buy Tickets
search
close
KBPI Mistletoe Jam

Halestorm + In This Moment

with New Year's Day

Event Information

Halestorm: Self-doubt and depression clawed at the edges of Lzzy Hale’s mind when it came time to pen Halestorm’s fourth album, a follow-up to 2015’s Into The Wild Life. The musician didn’t feel like she was where she needed to be, both professionally and personally. When she and her bandmates, Arejay Hale, Joe Hottinger and Josh Smith, began writing, Lzzy wasn’t even sure who she was. “I kept thinking, ‘Can I still do this?’” she says. “I went down a lot of rabbit holes, and I’m my own worst critic. I needed to get over a lot of internal hurdles during this writing and recording process. This record was about overcoming inner demons.”

The band began writing, but the first batch of songs didn’t feel quite right, so Halestorm scrapped it and started over. And in the end, Vicious represents Halestorm’s most personal and most inventive album, a deeply lived-with collection of songs teaming with genuine heart and soul. It’s also how Lzzy got her groove back. “I don’t think there was any other way for me to get through that difficult time than to write about it,” she says. “This record was like therapy.” The album was recorded with producer Nick Raskulinecz (Foo Fighters, Alice In Chains and Rush) at Nashville, TN’s Rock Falcon recording studio, and the producer, with whom the band had previously worked with on their 2017 covers EP ReAniMate 3.0: The CoVeRs eP, pushed each musician to a new place musically. Each song went through five or six versions, and ultimately carry the listener on a journey, emphasizing the band’s strengths while revealing a dynamic evolution.

“Nick pushed us from 10 to 11,” Lzzy says. “He pushed us mentally and physically. There are some things on this record that I didn’t think were physically possible for both myself and my bandmates. It was really exciting to see that happen for the first time in the studio. To be able to still surprise each other like that – and to surprise yourself – is no small feat.”

One of the main goals in the studio was to capture real, human moments within the music, the sorts of unexpected instances that occur onstage. In recent years, Halestorm has introduced improvised flashes into their live sets with the idea of creating controlled chaos between the more orchestrated songs. The music on Vicious embraces this sensibility. The musicians worked to ensure that every song had its own dynamic feeling, both overall and within each verse. “It wasn’t just about looping the same thing over and over again,” Lzzy notes. “The idea was: Where can we take this that’s not predicable?”

The resulting album, which was culled from over 20 recorded tunes, solidifies everything Halestorm stands for as a band. It’s about empowerment, an ideal that the musicians have encouraged for years, and the songs urge you to be unapologetically yourself. Ultimately, it’s not just about being strong and taking on the storm – but also about how you rise above that storm. The album’s title comes from “Vicious,” a gritty, surging rock number that was written during the last moments of studio time. The song features the line “What doesn’t kill me makes me vicious,” a rallying cry to overcome any obstacles. “It’s about being strong and fierce,” Lzzy says. “The climate of the world right now is always seeping in, so we wanted it to feel really positive and empowering.” “Uncomfortable,” one of the first songs written for the album, has a similar tone, featuring a rapid-fire verse and impressive vocal licks on the chorus. “You can’t please everybody as much as you may want to try,” Lzzy says of the song. “By being yourself you may make people uncomfortable. I saw a lot of our fans struggling with that. This song is saying that it’s okay to not make everyone happy all the time. You can be yourself and that’s okay. And, in fact, you should be proud of that.”

References to Halestorm’s fans and Lzzy’s constant interactions with them online or on Twitter thread through the album. The musician, who calls the band’s fanbase “our comrades in this crazy life,” wanted to drop Easter eggs into the lyrics, reminding longtime listeners of past conversations or instances in Lzzy’s personal life they’ll likely remember. “I feel like our fans deserve that type of openness from us at this point,” she says. “The love they’ve given us comes full circle.”

Since their inception in 1998, Halestorm have toured extensively with a diverse variety of artists, including Eric Church, Avenged Sevenfold, Alice Cooper, Rob Zombie, ZZ Top and Evanescence. They’ve played around 2,500 dates around the world to date, and performed at festivals like Taste of Chaos and Rockstar Energy Drink Uproar Festival. The band scored a Grammy for Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance in 2013, and Lzzy was named the “Dimebag Darrell Shredder of the Year” at the Metal Hammer Golden Gods Awards in 2016. Both Halestorm and The Strange Case of… were certified Gold, further evidencing Halestorm’s massively supportive fanbase. Halestorm have also made history:  “Love Bites (So Do I),” the hit single from The Strange Case of… ascended to No. 1 at Active Rock radio in the U.S., making Halestorm the first-ever female-fronted group to earn the top spot on the format.

Today Halestorm exists as a beacon of hope and inspiration for musicians, particularly female musicians who want to brave the challenges of the music industry. Lzzy has been a pioneer in rock and proven that women have a place on the stage. Every night on tour, women – and men – in the audience can look to her and realize they too have the power to carve out their own path. Younger musicians admire her the same way she grew up admiring artists like Joan Jett and Stevie Nicks. “They helped me feel like I could do it, and I hope I’ve done the same for women today,” Lzzy says. “Trying to be my best self and not trying to be anything I’m not and being unapologetic feels like a good message. I feel a lot of responsibility to keep upholding that. I’m just trying to be the best me.”

Two decades into an accomplished career, Halestorm represents the results of true passion and hard work. The band has out-survived many of its peers and the musicians are still having fun after all this time. Vicious is evidence of a group of artists who refuse to ever plateau.

“This music chose us and we’re just hanging on,” Lzzy says. “Our greatest accomplishment is that we’ve been the same members for over 15 years and we’re continuing to make and release music. We want to always try new things. We’re still extremely hungry and open to opportunities, and we’re hungry to prove we deserve to be here. We’re so lucky to still be a band and have people care about our music. And there’s still so much more to do.”

 

In This Moment: 

Throughout history, art rejoices and revels inthe wisdom of women.

Within a deck of tarot cards, the High Priestess serves as the guardian of the unconscious. In Greek mythology, the old oracles celebratethe Mother Goddess.William Shakespeare posited portentous prescience in the form of MacBeth’s “Three Witches.” On their sixth full-length albumRitual,In This Moment—Maria Brink [vocals, piano], Chris Howorth [lead guitar], Travis Johnson [bass], Randy Weitzel [rhythm guitar], and Kent Diimel [drums]—unearth a furious and focused feminine fire from a cauldron of jagged heavy metal, hypnotic alternative, and smoky voodoo blues.

It’s an evolution. It’s a statement. It’s In This Moment 2017...

“It’s like we’re going into the next realm,” asserts Maria. “I had a conviction of feeling empowered in my life and with myself. I always write from a personal place, and I needed to share that sense of strength. I’ve never been afraid to hold back. Sometimes, I can be very suggestive. However, I wanted to show our fans that this is the most powerful side of myself and it’s without overt sexuality. It’s that deeper serious fire inside of my heart.”

“What Maria is saying comes from deep inside,” Chris affirms. “This time, we had a bunch of ideas started before we hit thestudio. There was a really clear direction. It’sdifferent.”

The group spent two years supporting their biggest album yet 2014’s Black Widow. Upon release, it seized their highest position to dateon the Billboard Top 200, bowing at #8.Simultaneously, itclinched #3 on the Hard Rock Albums chart and spawned a series of hitssuch as“Sick Like Me,” “Big Bad Wolf,” and “Sex Metal Barbie”—all cracking 8 million Spotify streams each and topping Rock Radio.Meanwhile, the band’s signature smash “Whore” crossedthe 20-million mark.

Furthermore, thetitle track off In This Moment's 2012 album, Blood, has been certified gold by the RIAA. A remarkable accomplishment,the companion music video for "Blood"has been viewed over 27 million times.

Between headline tours, they incinerated stages everywhere from Rock On The Range to Download Festival. In March 2016,Maria and Chris commenced writing forwhat would become the new recordwith longtime collaborator and multiple GRAMMY®Award-nominated producer Kevin Churko [Five Finger Death Punch, Ozzy Osbourne] at his Las Vegas compound.

Following a high-profile summer 2016 tour with Korn and Rob Zombie, the duo began writing. Then, Maria visited Salem, MA for the very first time with all of the women in her family quite appropriately during Halloween.

“We were really tapping the energy there,” she says. “We were honoring each other. I was seeking inspiration and experience to inspire me in this album. I was trying to find a lot of truth in myself. I loved Salem. I was blownaway by how visually beautiful it is. The history of the witch burnings is fascinating. It was a special ceremonial journey.”

Galvanized and inspired, Maria and Chris returned to Kevin’s stronghold to complete recording. In an atmosphere ofcandles, crystals, incense, and a cacklingfireplace, they expanded their aural palette once again, welcoming a doom blues bombast into the sonic fold.

“We love Black Widow, but it was very electronic,” Chris explains. “This is a little more organic, emphasizing guitars, bass, drums, and vocals. We slowed down the groove a little bit. I got to play some slide guitar, and I’ve never done that. There’s a bluesy side, which we’vealsonever had.”

“We always want to grow and evolve,” Mariaadds. “It was a chance to get a little more serious.”

That progression shines through the first single “Oh Lord.” A minimal drum and handclap echoes as Maria’s wild incantation takes hold. Guitars shiver and shake as the frontwoman delivers an undeniable refrain.

“The meaning of ‘Oh Lord’is central to the album,” she reveals. “I should be able to have a relationship with what I perceive God to be. Forme, it’s this strength and light. When I was younger, I felt guilty for thinking of these things. I’m not supposed to touch an oracle card, atarot card, or these beautiful things,because they’re ‘bad.’I had these fears in me for a long time like, ‘Is this wrong?’I realized I don’t have to be afraid anymore. There’s a lot of learning and an awakening in that one.”

Inverting everyone’s favoriteBilly Idolnuptial anthem, “Black Wedding” sees Maria walk down the aisle of musical madness with none other than Judas Priest frontman Rob Halford. Co-written with Stevens, it’s an explosive and enchanting duet.

“I can’t believe thathappened,” beams Chris. “Maria hit up Rob and asked if he was interested. He jumped right on it. I can’t believe we got him.”

“Who doesn’t love ‘White Wedding?’,” laughs Maria. “We wanted to do a spin-off that’s creative. It’s a question-and-answer between me and another voice. The chorus essentially says this isn’t going to be the opposite of a happy ending! You’re becoming empowered by heartbreak.”

Chris breaks out the slide on the raging “River of Fire,” while “Witching Hour” dances around the flamesto a new wave-inspired groove and midnight lore as Maria recants, “This idea of me being burned as a witch in a past life for teaching people to be free.”Elsewhere, “Roots” practically opens up the earth with its sheer seismic force.

“Sometimes, I have to go through pain in order to forgive and let go,” she adds. “I love to thank the hate in people. It’s that sort of energy. I’ll be okay, hold my headstrong, push forward, do what I’ve got to do, and prevail.”

Simultaneously, In This Moment breathe a dark new life into the Phil Collins’ classic “In The Air Tonight.”

“We can’t reproduce what he did in a million years,” she says. “It’s one of the best songs ever. We did our own interpretation and made it a little more sinister like ourritual.”

The ritual has begun, and In This Moment ignite abrighterfirethan ever before here.

“When fans hear this, I want them to feel the music, whether they take away sadness, anger, or happiness,” concludes Chris. “As a kid, I remember listening to records and putting them on repeat over and over again. I’d love for the worldto listen and absorb thisas a piece of work.”

Maria leaves off, “I want everybody to be unafraid of who they are and not worry about what the rest of society says. Be strong. Be loud. We love our fans deeply. I hope everybody feels that love and powerful in who they are.”

 

New Year's Day: It’s amazing what can happen when one surrenders to the darkness, floating into the uncertain and the undetermined, trusting in the will of a greater plan in pursuit of the creative muse.

New Years Day went from the “Kevin Says” platform to the main stage on Vans Warped Tour. They went from a tiny corner in the “AP Recommends” section to the cover of Alternative Press.

Ashley Costello had a vision for New Years Day, one conceived by an everyday teen consumed with the music and imagery of trailblazing heroes like My Chemical Romance, Marilyn Manson, and AFI, while equally obsessed with the grand theatricality of the macabre. Costello forged her creative vehicle through blood, sweat, tears, and makeup brushes, clutching and clawing forward with a tight grip on creative control through early lineups, demos, and an obscure debut.

New Years Day fully came into its own in 2013, delivering the goods to a vibrant audience enticed by dynamic live performances, with their Century Media debut, Victim to Villain. The Epidemic EP that followed further cemented their place in the heavy music landscape, offering melodic treats of whimsy wrapped in haunting and devastating rock majesty. Their 2015 album Malevolence showcases the full spectrum of what New Years Day was able to achieve, equally referencing architects of wit and madness like Edgar Allen Poe and Tim Burton, alongside musical forces Rob Zombie, Evanescence, and Alkaline Trio.

New challenges and new worlds beckon, but first, it’s time for a celebratory look inward. This comes in the form of a brand new EP, Diary of a Creep, which follows the tradition of landmark releases like Garage Days by Metallica by paying tribute to the artists who shaped the band, even as they continually redefine their music with each successive bold stage of their evolution.

Having already proven their diverse ability and devotion to a variety of genres with covers of songs by Lady Gaga, My Chemical Romance, and Kehlani, with Diary of a Creep New Years Day offers an even broader take on the molecular structure that strengthened their own signature sound.

There’s “Only Happy When it Rains,” a somber alt-rock anthem by the multiplatinum Garbage, the Shirley Manson fronted band which includes songwriter and performer Butch Vig (who produced landmark albums by Nirvana, Smashing Pumpkins, Green Day, and Foo Fighters). There’s New Years Day’s version of the Linkin Park mega-hit “Crawling,” with Costello putting her own spin on the fierce vocal delivery of the late Chester Bennington. There’s “Don’t Speak,” the smash ballad from No Doubt’s diamond-selling album Tragic Kingdom. Dark new wave finds its way into the EP via New Order’s “Bizarre Love Triangle.” On the other end of the New Years Day spectrum, there’s Pantera classic “Fucking Hostile,” now a staple of New Years Day’s live show.

With a unique aesthetic identity and a powerful sound honed in clubs, theaters, and global festival stages (like Rock On The Range, Louder Than Life), New Years Day stand ready to claim a dark destiny that has summoned them with warm invitation since their inception. Bigger and wonderfully diverse audiences have already warmed to the band thanks to successful tours supporting Halestorm, Motionless In White, and Birthday Massacre. New Years Day music videos like “Angel Eyes,” “Kill or Be Killed,” and “Defame Me” have amassed over 20 million views. Produced by Mitch Marlow, who has co-written songs with In This Moment and Papa Roach, the Diary of a Creep EP arrives just as New Years Day assembles material for their next full length effort, freeing themselves from the shackles of preconceived expectations and digging in to fully embrace a new chapter.

New Years Day is to be cherished for an “admirable bite and sharp hooks laced with a plentiful amount of [loud] pomp,” as UK tastemaker Rock Sound rightly pointed out. Metal Hammer cheerfully agreed: “Get ready for the unstoppable, spooktacular rise of New Years Day.” 

Churning emotional smolder, iconoclastic bombast, savage flamboyance, heady fantasy, and the adventurous spirit of Alice Through the Looking Glass all collide within New Years Day. The band evokes the brightest moments of fellow outsider art, championing melancholy and gloom in the most empowering of ways, demanding respect and recognition from elites and conformists. An intense confidence coupled with a playful cleverness remains the core of what Costello and her merry band of miscreant road pirates can do, ensuring the fulfillment of bold premonitions about their future. From “AP Recommends” to the cover, from Kevin Says to mainstage, indeed.

Read More

Artist Information

Self-doubt and depression clawed at the edges of Lzzy Hale’s mind when it came time to pen Halestorm’s fourth album, a follow-up to 2015’s Into The Wild Life. The musician didn’t feel like she was where she needed to be, both professionally and personally. When she and her bandmates, Arejay Hale, Joe Hottinger and Josh Smith, began writing, Lzzy wasn’t even sure who she was. “I kept thinking, ‘Can I still do this?’” she says. “I went down a lot of rabbit holes, and I’m my own worst critic. I needed to get over a lot of internal hurdles during this writing and recording process. This record was about overcoming inner demons.”

The band began writing, but the first batch of songs didn’t feel quite right, so Halestorm scrapped it and started over. And in the end, Vicious represents Halestorm’s most personal and most inventive album, a deeply lived-with collection of songs teaming with genuine heart and soul. It’s also how Lzzy got her groove back. “I don’t think there was any other way for me to get through that difficult time than to write about it,” she says. “This record was like therapy.” The album was recorded with producer Nick Raskulinecz (Foo Fighters, Alice In Chains and Rush) at Nashville, TN’s Rock Falcon recording studio, and the producer, with whom the band had previously worked with on their 2017 covers EP ReAniMate 3.0: The CoVeRs eP, pushed each musician to a new place musically. Each song went through five or six versions, and ultimately carry the listener on a journey, emphasizing the band’s strengths while revealing a dynamic evolution.

“Nick pushed us from 10 to 11,” Lzzy says. “He pushed us mentally and physically. There are some things on this record that I didn’t think were physically possible for both myself and my bandmates. It was really exciting to see that happen for the first time in the studio. To be able to still surprise each other like that – and to surprise yourself – is no small feat.”

One of the main goals in the studio was to capture real, human moments within the music, the sorts of unexpected instances that occur onstage. In recent years, Halestorm has introduced improvised flashes into their live sets with the idea of creating controlled chaos between the more orchestrated songs. The music on Vicious embraces this sensibility. The musicians worked to ensure that every song had its own dynamic feeling, both overall and within each verse. “It wasn’t just about looping the same thing over and over again,” Lzzy notes. “The idea was: Where can we take this that’s not predicable?”

The resulting album, which was culled from over 20 recorded tunes, solidifies everything Halestorm stands for as a band. It’s about empowerment, an ideal that the musicians have encouraged for years, and the songs urge you to be unapologetically yourself. Ultimately, it’s not just about being strong and taking on the storm – but also about how you rise above that storm. The album’s title comes from “Vicious,” a gritty, surging rock number that was written during the last moments of studio time. The song features the line “What doesn’t kill me makes me vicious,” a rallying cry to overcome any obstacles. “It’s about being strong and fierce,” Lzzy says. “The climate of the world right now is always seeping in, so we wanted it to feel really positive and empowering.” “Uncomfortable,” one of the first songs written for the album, has a similar tone, featuring a rapid-fire verse and impressive vocal licks on the chorus. “You can’t please everybody as much as you may want to try,” Lzzy says of the song. “By being yourself you may make people uncomfortable. I saw a lot of our fans struggling with that. This song is saying that it’s okay to not make everyone happy all the time. You can be yourself and that’s okay. And, in fact, you should be proud of that.”

References to Halestorm’s fans and Lzzy’s constant interactions with them online or on Twitter thread through the album. The musician, who calls the band’s fanbase “our comrades in this crazy life,” wanted to drop Easter eggs into the lyrics, reminding longtime listeners of past conversations or instances in Lzzy’s personal life they’ll likely remember. “I feel like our fans deserve that type of openness from us at this point,” she says. “The love they’ve given us comes full circle.”

Since their inception in 1998, Halestorm have toured extensively with a diverse variety of artists, including Eric Church, Avenged Sevenfold, Alice Cooper, Rob Zombie, ZZ Top and Evanescence. They’ve played around 2,500 dates around the world to date, and performed at festivals like Taste of Chaos and Rockstar Energy Drink Uproar Festival. The band scored a Grammy for Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance in 2013, and Lzzy was named the “Dimebag Darrell Shredder of the Year” at the Metal Hammer Golden Gods Awards in 2016. Both Halestorm and The Strange Case of… were certified Gold, further evidencing Halestorm’s massively supportive fanbase. Halestorm have also made history:  “Love Bites (So Do I),” the hit single from The Strange Case of… ascended to No. 1 at Active Rock radio in the U.S., making Halestorm the first-ever female-fronted group to earn the top spot on the format.

Today Halestorm exists as a beacon of hope and inspiration for musicians, particularly female musicians who want to brave the challenges of the music industry. Lzzy has been a pioneer in rock and proven that women have a place on the stage. Every night on tour, women – and men – in the audience can look to her and realize they too have the power to carve out their own path. Younger musicians admire her the same way she grew up admiring artists like Joan Jett and Stevie Nicks. “They helped me feel like I could do it, and I hope I’ve done the same for women today,” Lzzy says. “Trying to be my best self and not trying to be anything I’m not and being unapologetic feels like a good message. I feel a lot of responsibility to keep upholding that. I’m just trying to be the best me.”

Two decades into an accomplished career, Halestorm represents the results of true passion and hard work. The band has out-survived many of its peers and the musicians are still having fun after all this time. Vicious is evidence of a group of artists who refuse to ever plateau.

“This music chose us and we’re just hanging on,” Lzzy says. “Our greatest accomplishment is that we’ve been the same members for over 15 years and we’re continuing to make and release music. We want to always try new things. We’re still extremely hungry and open to opportunities, and we’re hungry to prove we deserve to be here. We’re so lucky to still be a band and have people care about our music. And there’s still so much more to do.”

Read More
*Service and handling fees are added to the price of each ticket.
  • Sat, December 1, 2018
  • 6:45 PM
  • $10.67 - $85.00
  • All Ages
  • Buy Tickets
  • subaru-40.png
  • 1stbank-logo.gif
  • Gothic Theatre
  • The Bluebird Theater
  • The Ogden Theatre
  • fiddlers-226.png
  • paramount-logo.png
  • pepsicenter-logo.png
  • dicks-logo.png
  • Aloft Broomfield Denver